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Reblogged from merryweatherblue  178,589 notes

merryweatherblue:

I took my little brother (who falls on the autism spectrum) to see Guardians of the Galaxy and after this scene he lit up like a Christmas tree and screamed “He’s like me! He can’t do metaphors!” And for the rest of the film my brother stared at Drax in a state of rapture. 

So for the last 6 days I have heard my brother repeatedly quote all of the Drax lines from the movie verbatim (one of his talents), begin studying vocabulary test words, and tell everyone he knows that people with autism can also be superheroes.

Now I am not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever, intended to be autistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart to see my brother have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor. And that is pretty damn awesome. 

So while I adored Guardians of the Galaxy as a great fun loving film with cool characters I can do nothing but thank Marvel Studios and Dave Bautista for finally bringing a superhero to the screen that my little brother can relate to.

I’ve found that many people seem to dislike Pixar's 2006 film Cars. The main reason for this ill-feeling is that the idea of a world populated by talking cars is hardly an original one, and many feel it falls short of the studio’s usual creative genius. However, I fear these people have very much missed the point of the film. It isn’t about talking cars any more than Toy Story is about sentient toys. These are simply the vehicles (pardon the pun) which Pixar uses to tell more in-depth stories. In fact this depth hidden behind a quirky gimmick may account for the studio’s high level of success with both children and adults. Even the redemptive journey of self-obsessed race car Lightning McQueen is not the film’s main message. At its heart Cars is about what really matters in life. When you strip away all the material things it’s the people in our lives and the relationships we share with them that will truly last.

I’ve found that many people seem to dislike Pixar's 2006 film Cars. The main reason for this ill-feeling is that the idea of a world populated by talking cars is hardly an original one, and many feel it falls short of the studio’s usual creative genius. However, I fear these people have very much missed the point of the film. It isn’t about talking cars any more than Toy Story is about sentient toys. These are simply the vehicles (pardon the pun) which Pixar uses to tell more in-depth stories. In fact this depth hidden behind a quirky gimmick may account for the studio’s high level of success with both children and adults. Even the redemptive journey of self-obsessed race car Lightning McQueen is not the film’s main message. At its heart Cars is about what really matters in life. When you strip away all the material things it’s the people in our lives and the relationships we share with them that will truly last.